Saturday, November 19, 2005

The Chai Wallah Wordsmith

Laxman Rao is a Delhi chai wallah with a difference, Randeep Ramesh in the Guardian reports.

Rao is the author of 18 novels, plays and political essays, and although he has hitherto made no money at all from his writings, his fortunes look set to change with his latest novel Ramdas. And he writes in Hindi:
Although it is spoken by half of India's 1 billion people, its writing is absent in the literary canon of India, which is dominated by exiles such as Salman Rushdie and Vikram Seth. 'I do not read these books. They do not talk about the India I know,' says Rao. 'The stories do not mean anything to me or people like me. India lives in villages, small towns, on streets. The authors do not.'

Hmmm ... wonder if our teh tarik vendors can "pull" fictions as well as tea.

7 comments:

Greenbottle said...

probably the only likely thing our teh tarik guys can pull is that precious little handle in between their legs...

but then again who knows...afterall we have movie stars coming from officeboys, drug addicts and girls of err...questionable repute...

Anisah said...

Greenbottle, and we had a president (the American one) from an actor, whose wife was, one of the pillars who rather successfully side-lined creative talents who didn't agree with his socio-economic views.

Yes, the previous sentence was laced with some irony. The one following is not. We have several memoirs of geishas published, but some people are more focused on geisha hunting, in all meanings of the word, from hunting to possess, to hunting to profess.

bibliobibuli said...

*LOL* this is all getting too deep for me. teh tarik anyone?

Anisah said...

Sharon, how I would trade my cup of tea on my table now, with teh tarik in Malaysia. I'll even buy a round of teh tarik for everyone!

Funny, when I eventually sit down to a glass of teh tarik in Malaysia, I shall miss the things I take for granted in London. Most peculiar, I long for things I can't get at the moment.

Sharon, you do blog very early in the morning, before 9 a.m.? Wow.

bibliobibuli said...

It's nice to miss things when you're overseas ... it makes you appreciate coming home. We'll hold you to your promise to buy teh tarik for everyone!

Yes, I blog first thing in the morning. I was plagued with insomnia a few months ago and would spring out of bed at 5 something. Blogging mkaes me happy so I find it a great way to start the day while I have a couple of cups of tea. But I often draft entries at other times of the day, particularly when I'm reading my favourite websites and inspiration leaps on me.

Anonymous said...

No but some newspaper vendors and "jaga"'s can.. they were students during the occupation and can write very well.

Anonymous said...

Well if you will write in Hindi.Maybe if he wrote in English... :)