Thursday, May 22, 2008

Stairway to Heaven?

Running out of space for books? Build your bookcases into the stairs!

This is just a moment to pause and ask you, what are you reading and is it any good?

I've been freewheeling for the last few days - reading magazines and non-fiction (Tim Butcher's excellent Blood River) while working up the energy to plunge back into fiction!

26 comments:

kamal s said...

Hi there!

Would like to recommend you a couple of great fictions, for your your comeback sojourn to novel soon!

1)The God of Animals - Aryn Kyle. This book will remind you of the 1st time you read To Kill a Mockingbird.

2)No One Belongs Here More than You - Miranda July. A great collection of short stories.

I just got Out Stealing Horses based on your article.

mel said...

Just started Nadine Gordimer's 'The Conservationist'. So far so good.

Jade said...

Am on a roll with books on my TBR shelf.. recent reads:
Notes on a Scandal by Zoe Heller (made me sad, but gave me the chills;
Neverwhere by Neil Gaiman (preferred Stardust; and
The Time Traveler's by Audrey Niffenegger (loved this!.

Now reading Case Histories by Kate Atkinson (quite a page turner thus far).

Chet said...

I've been reading updates on the Chinese earthquake situation, and getting totally blown away by the stories of miracles and the resilience of the Chinese people. One of the latest stories I read was about how the survivors of the 1976 Tangshan earthquake are coming forward to help the survivors of the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, as a way to thank the government for helping them all those years ago. Also stories about how the Chinese themselves are not waiting for foreign aid but have to date raised more than 1.4 billion US dollars in cash and supplies all by themselves.

Oh, all these stories are not fiction but news stories.

Siege said...

Oh, I'm on my last pages of Byatt's Possession, and I've recently started reading The Black Dahlia.

Anonymous said...

Sharon, thanks for your question and lovely pic!
Because I need a break: More Twisted, by Jeffrey Deaver.
Also, The Life and Times of the Thunderbolt Kid, by Bill Bryson (to make me laugh)
And for non-fiction, something on our Prophet: In the Footsteps of the Prophet by Tariq Ramadan (well-written and engaging). Eliza.

Emily said...

Enjoying Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's "Hugh Fearlessly Eats It All" ~ a man after my own heart!

Bought a whole stack of books for my 51st birthday! Currently on third book from that stack!

Madcap Machinist said...

Right now: "Oblivion", short stories by David Foster Wallace (box of chocks).

Also reading "The End of the Poem", Paul Muldoon (tedious but enlightening).

Most interesting recent read: "The Devil's Cup", Stewart Lee Allen. A history of the world according to coffee, very entertaining travelogue too.

Madcap Machinist said...

p/s great stairs! I waaaant

lil ms d said...

unit trusts.

Yusuf/Martin said...

I've been trying to read Nick Hornby's A Long Way Down and Khaled Hosseini's The Kite Runner for ages now.

My reading seems to have slowed - maybe its because I am writing more, not sure, but I do manage to read Off The Edge most months.

Hornby's book - thought provoking and humorous at times.

Hosseini's also thought provoking but a little too managed in that American Oprah Winfry type way of naval gazing, soul searching cosy way - no offence but its a little trite.

Yusuf/Martin said...

forgot to mention I also read some stories from Silverfish New Writing 1 - I dug it out from Ipoh MPH mmmm a very good short story by a certain Sharon........

animah said...

Gosh, you're all reading such interesting things. Except Dina.

I'm in between books, but as I type this, my eye falls on Philip Roth's The Ghost Writer which I keep start stopping.

lil ms d said...

eh unit trusts are fun!

thegrouch said...

1. T.Rex and the Crater of Doom - Walter Alvarez

2. Start Late, Finish Rich - David Bach

3. Log Interpretation Principles/Applications - SLB (dead boring, am almost crying from how incomprehensible it is)

kam raslan said...

I love the stairs/bookshelf. Where is it? Just had a new bookshelf built onto my wall and it's great.

Going through a John Le Carre phase. Can't get enough of him.

animah said...

Kam, did you have a good carpenter?

The Grouch - logs as in seismic? and is SLB the SLB I used to work for?

thegrouch said...

animah - logs as in everything wiggly, seismic logs included. yep, that SLB.

Madcap Machinist said...

I'm studying a wireline log text too ...

Evey K. said...

hi i finished another trippy series of short strories from Haruki Murakami's Blind Willow, Sleeping Woman, I love his work and this series is a little more personal compared to some of his more bizarre pieces.

Am now going travelling and observing with Capote

bibliobibuli said...

ooh much good stuff here, though i think i'll give ms d's unit trusts and machinist'swireline log (whatever that is) a miss!

animah said...

Wireline was a tool first invented by the brothers Schlumberger back in 1926. It's this gadget (which nowdays you can attach to a drill) that goes in the well and measures (typically by gammaray) what's down there.
The wireline tool gets pulled back up to surface and then produces a log. A log, contrary to popular belief is not part of a tree but is a very, very long piece of paper with many colourful scribbles which apparently tell you where you can find, maybe just maybe, hydrocarbons. Or they could be water. Anyway, they're not rock - which is a different colour.
The wireline log which both MM and the Grouch find so captivating is what geologists drool over. I see this often, though I don't see what they see.
But it helps an oil and gas company see the extent of their reserves within a field and where to perforate within a given well, or where next to drill a well.

In a nutshell, without a wireline log, you can't drive your car.

Emily said...

One learns something new each day; due to the generousity of bloggers willing to share their knowledge! TQ!

SapiMalas said...

I just love this question no matter how many you have asked us, dear Sharon. I'm reading "Special Topics in Calamity Physics" by Marisha Pessl. Very entertaining although not as light as I thought. So many details until I don't know how the author kept track of them. By the way, I'm a fan ;-)

bibliobibuli said...

and no matter how many times i ask the question i love the answers! but i always feel a bit guilty because i own a lot of the books mentioned but haven't got round to them yet, including "special topics" whioch i really do want to read

Elizabeth said...

Reading The End of Wall Street, Anne Lamott's Bird by Bird and The Sign by Raymond Khoury. I can't just read one book at a time - I guess I have a short attention span.

And my word ... I want that library/stairs...